Delusions, COVID, and Recovery

Like many others with dementia, Kate has experienced delusions. They became more frequent over the past year. With the arrival of the pandemic and sheltering, they increased significantly. I attribute this to the fact that her life was less stimulating. I tried to compensate by entertaining her more at home, but we were still more sedentary than before. As a result, she started taking breaks to rest. Upon waking, she often experienced delusions. By the time she and I had our personal experience with COVID, they occurred during a significant portion of each day.

Once she had the virus, however, they disappeared. Overall, she was simply weak and didn’t talk much. It’s been four weeks since she came home from the hospital. She was gradually recovering but still wasn’t having any delusions. That changed last week when she experienced her first one since contracting the virus. They have become more common since. Night before last, she spent about forty-five minutes talking to me about a delusion that involved a group of people who were with us. As happened so much in the past, she thought we were in a hotel or lodge and had plans to do something with the others the next day.

This has caused me to have an unusual feeling. I had always interpreted the delusions as a sign of her decline from Alzheimer’s. Suddenly, I found myself viewing them as a sign of her recovery, not to her pre-Alzheimer’s self but to the way she was before getting COVID. It might seem strange, but I am happy to see this change. It is far better than the way she had been under the influence of the emotional and and psychological impact of the disease.

Her delusions represent signs that the effects of COVID are diminishing. She is also talking more and expressing more signs of happiness. These are encouraging signs. I just wish her recovery were faster.

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