Childlike and Tired

On Monday Kate and I had very little contact until 4:30. I got her up at almost 11:30. She was more than a bit confused but didn’t express the kind of fear she sometimes does. Recently, she has been unsteady after sitting up on the side of the bed or the sofa. The day before, she had fallen back on the bed before attempting to stand up. This time I asked her to sit for a moment. I put my hand on her back to support her. Then I helped her up. She got along all right but was very insecure as we walked to the bathroom.

She experienced one of a number of childlike behaviors when we went to the car before getting a takeout lunch from Panera. She noticed a Dr. Pepper baseball cap that she had long ago hung on the knob of a cabinet door in the garage. Periodically, she takes interest in it. This time she was just like a little child discovering something new and exciting. She thought it was a nice decorative touch (my words, not hers) and said she might hang a number of them around the garage.

After lunch, she was ready to rest. That worked out well because I had a Zoom meeting at 2:00, and she fell asleep on the sofa. She must have been quite tired because she didn’t take off her shoes nor lift her feet to the sofa. She just fell over on a pillow from a sitting position and slept until at least 4:30 when I noticed she had opened her eyes. I got up from my chair and walked over to her and asked if she was about ready to get up. She told me not to talk, that she wanted to talk with me later. She looked like she was bothered by something. I said, “I love you.” She said, “That may be the right thing to say but not right now.” I started to ask her to explain, but she cut me off. I took her hand and told her I would be seated across from her if she needed me. When I started to release my hand, she gripped it tightly. I sat down on the corner of the table in front of the sofa. It wasn’t long before it felt too uncomfortable. I started to gently pull my hand away, and she held it tighter. In five or ten minutes, she was asleep. I took a seat close to the sofa and waited another fifteen minutes before waking her for dinner.

Whatever was bothering her faded from her memory like so many other things. It’s another good example of the pattern of her delusions. She may be resting, but her brain is active and doesn’t function the way it did before Alzheimer’s took over. As I have said before, she had experiences like this before sheltering. I believe, however, that the reduction in her activity has exacerbated the problem. I should add that it is not boredom alone that leads her to rest. She is really tired.

Kate Was Up Early Again This Morning

Kate called me at 7:15 this morning just as I was about to begin my walk. She was wide awake. I commented on that and asked if she would like me to fix her some breakfast. She nodded, and I proceeded to get her up and finish her “morninglies” (with thanks to Tom Robinson for introducing me to this term) before heading to the kitchen.

Mornings are her most likely times to be confused. I use that term when she seems bothered by not knowing where she is, who she is, who I am, or what to do. I think insecure was a better word to describe how she was this morning.  As she got out of the bed, she said, “Help me; I don’t know what to do.” . She repeated variations of this multiple times before we left the bedroom.

It is not unusual for her to ask, “What do I do?” when we enter the bathroom. Another time recently, she said, “You’ll have to tell me what to do because I’ve never done this before.” Today, I had to do more than explain. She seemed worried that she would fall as she sat on the toilet. I had to put my arms around her and let her weight rest on them. I supported her until she was seated.

She enjoyed her breakfast of apple juice, a small bowl of blueberries, and two slices of cheese toast. She finished more quickly than usual, and we went to the family room where I thought we might read something. I wasn’t surprised when she looked tired, and I asked if she would like to rest. She said, “May I?” (That is something she says frequently. She also asks if she can take off her shoes. She is very respectful, at least 99% of the time. It is more like I am the “person in charge” rather than her husband. Of course, I am both, so I understand. She generally thinks of me as older than she is. She commented on that yesterday, and I asked how old she was. She said she was eighteen.)

She started resting at 8:40. It is now 10:20, and she is sound asleep. Fifteen minutes ago, she opened her eyes and said something I didn’t understand. This is a day for the sitter. I should have plenty of time for us to have lunch before she arrives at 1:00. I plan to make a quick trip to the grocery and then return home for a walk. The balance of the afternoon I plan to remain at home and work on my computer.

Kate and Breakfast

I’ve lost count of the number of times Kate has had breakfast since we have been sheltered, but it happened again yesterday morning and was especially surprising because of how early she got up.

I got up around 6:30 and went to the bathroom. When I left to get dressed, I noticed that Kate wasn’t in the bed. I called to her and asked where she was. I heard her say, “I’m in here.” She was in the kitchen. As best I could determine, she had been looking for the bathroom. That’s where I took her. She was confused but not disturbed in the way I might have expected.

After finishing in the bathroom, she seemed unusually wide awake. I asked if she wanted to go back to bed or get dressed and eat breakfast. She said, “I don’t know.” I suggested she go ahead and get ready for the day. I think I was motivated by the fact that the past two days, I thought she was going to stay in bed most of the day. Fortunately, I was able to coax her to get up both days. The surprising thing the second day was how quickly her mood changed when she finally decided to get up. At first, she seemed rather resistant. Then I said something (don’t remember what) that got her attention, and she was ready to get up.

She was far more willing to follow my suggestion yesterday. As it turned out, this was a morning when we really did eat breakfast together. The other mornings, I had finished my breakfast and just enjoyed my coffee while she ate. When she finished, I took her into the family room where she wanted to rest. That worked for me because it gave me time to take my morning walk.

The next surprise was her wanting to go home after resting. It was over an hour before I planned to have lunch, so I thought that might make for a restful outing, and off we went. We were back home in just over thirty minutes, and she wanted to rest again. I welcomed that because I purchased a new computer, and that gave me time to setup a few remaining things on it.

This morning I had finished breakfast and my walk. A short time later as I was preparing to upload this post, I heard her say, “Hey, what do I do?” I went to her and found she was wide awake. I got her up and dressed and fixed her breakfast again. When she finished, I suggested we go to the family room. I mentioned Anne Frank’s Diary and asked if she would be interested in my reading some of it to her. It has been a long time since we had done this, so I started at the beginning. We didn’t get too far before she was tired although she seemed interested in the book. She has been resting about thirty minutes and appears to be asleep.

I always try to figure out what causes changes like the increased frequency of getting up so early. I am often left with only speculation. That seems to be the case this time. I do know, however, that it coincides with sheltering. That has affected her sleeping and resting. Some days she rests more than others. One possibility is that she wakes up earlier following a day when she has had more than enough sleep; however, she is ready to rest not too long after getting up. Of course, that is true no matter what time she gets up. One exception was this past Friday when she was awake the entire time the sitter was here. Saturday and Sunday she didn’t get up until around noon when I waked her, and she wasn’t eager to get up then.

There is another explanation that may be related to her sleep pattern. It seems to me that she drifts in and out of sleep more frequently than in the past. That has also been true during the night in the past week or so. I’ll continue to observe as carefully as I can. It will be interesting to see what, if any, other changes occur when (if?) we start to eat out for lunch and dinner again.

Follow-up on Kate’s Sleeping

When I posted my previous update concerning Kate’s sleeping, it was 9:30. She was still asleep. I didn’t make any effort to get her up before 11:00. She was awake and pleased to see me. Her response was strange in that she started to cry. I asked if she could tell me why. She couldn’t, but she was able to tell me she was happy. That made me wonder if she had been awake for a while and didn’t know where I was or what to do.

She wasn’t eager to get up, but she did so willingly. She was very unsteady on her feet and very confused. We got a takeout lunch that we brought back to the house. Her confusion continued while we were eating. She couldn’t identify her hamburger patty, the bun, or the fries. She ate a good bit of the bun, but I think she would have left the patty if I hadn’t put pieces on her fork and fed them to her. The surprise to me (a pleasant one) was that she ate hardly any fries.

When we finished, we spent about thirty minutes looking at one of her family photo books. Then I turned on Phantom of the Opera on YouTube. I was doubtful that she would be interested since it wasn’t just a concert of the music but the full stage production. I was right. I turned it off after fifteen minutes.

She was tired and rested on the sofa for an hour before sitting up. She was confused and said, “Where am I?” I told her she was at home. She said she wanted to “get outa here.” I told her I would take her but wanted to show her a couple of things first. I took her into the hallway to see her pictures of her Grandmother, mother, and her father. She didn’t express her usual interest. She kept saying she wanted to go.

I took her by the hand and walked toward the garage where I intended take a short drive in the car and return home. Before getting to the garage, she changed her mind and wanted to stay. We went back to the family room. She said she was hungry. I got her some blueberries and cheese for a snack. She ate them and has been resting for about forty-five minutes. It is 5:15. We have plenty of lasagna left over from last night. I think I’ll serve that instead of bringing something in. We’ll both enjoy it.

More on Kate and Sleep/Rest

Three months ago Kate wouldn’t get up on a day when the sitter was coming. She was still in bed when I left and also when I arrived home. It was about 4:15 when she finally got up.  There have been at least two other times she has slept until late in the afternoon, once until after 5:00. There have been several other days when she has not wanted to get up but ultimately agreed to do so.

When I tried to get her up yesterday, she was resistant. Pushing her never works, so I decided to let her rest a little more. After several unsuccessful attempts, I decided to encourage her. I told her I wanted to have lunch with her and hoped she would get up. That didn’t work at first, but, with a little coaxing, it did.

It was running close to the time for the sitter’s arrival. I put in an online delivery order from Panera. Kate was quiet but enjoyed her lunch. We were still eating when Mary arrived. When we finished, I took Kate in the family room and showed her several of her photo books she might enjoy. Then I prepared for a conference call.

While I was on the call, Kate went to sleep on the sofa and was still resting when Mary left. I went to the sofa and sat beside her. She continued to rest. I told her it was pizza night and asked if she would like to go with me to pick it up. I didn’t get a response. I decided to let her rest a few more minutes.

In fifteen minutes, I tried again without success. She responded the same way she has done when sleeping in the bed in the morning. She was good-natured and said, “I’ll get up in a few minutes.” The problem is that she never does.

I decided to cook lasagna. No, I didn’t make it. I bought it earlier in the week at a takeout place that has usually has two or three frozen dishes they prepare for times like these. Before eating, I asked if she would like to join me. She didn’t, so I went ahead. I fixed a salad (spinach and arugula with blueberries, tomatoes, and slivered almonds) to go with the lasagna. It was an unusually good meal.

After eating, I told Kate is was time to get ready for bed. She didn’t want to move and asked if she could sleep right there on the sofa. I told her that she needed to get to the bathroom and put on her night clothes and then it would be easier to get in bed. I was surprised when she agreed. She was in bed shortly after 7:30 and quickly went to sleep. She was asleep when I got in bed and slept through the night. I expected her to get up early this morning, but she didn’t make a sound when I got up. She is still sleeping at 9:15.

So, what’s going on? As so often happens, I don’t know. I know that it was a year ago that her sleep pattern began to change. Over that time, it has been less predictable than it was before that time. She has clearly been more tired than she used to be. During the past three months that has increased, especially in the past 3-4 weeks. She is not on her feet much before she wants to rest. That often occurs when I give her a tour of the house. She enjoys herself but gets worn out and wants to sit down. As I have speculated before, this may be a natural process as her body begins to shut down. Her doctor seems to think that might be it. Whatever it is, I suspect the fact that she has resisted any exercise must have exacerbated the problem. The good news is that she has not seemed disturbed or frightened. I am eager to see what happens today.

Adapting to Changes in Kate’s Sleep Pattern

I’ve alluded many times to my OCD tendencies and my adaptability with respect to Kate’s Alzheimer’s. For the most part, I am pretty flexible and don’t experience any anxiety when things can’t go the way I planned. The hardest thing has always been my commitment to be on time. Kate’s Alzheimer’s presents a problem for me. I try to allow plenty of time to have her ready for all appointments and other obligations. This would include those that are self-imposed like having lunch together before the sitter arrives. I had a schedule that was working, but Kate’s recent changes in her sleep/rest pattern have upset things a bit.

Ironically, I’ve experienced more anxiety on the days we have a sitter than on the days we don’t. That doesn’t seem like the way it should be. It really shouldn’t, but the problem for me is two things. I feel a need to have Kate ready when the sitter arrives. It also involves the plans I have made for myself during that time. On Monday, my Rotary club meets at 12:30. The sitter arrives at noon. That works fine unless I’ve had trouble getting Kate up and dressed. This is self-imposed because I wasn’t sure how comfortable Kate would be having the sitter get her out of bed, help her with toileting, and dressing her. I am less sensitive to that now, but I still like for her to up and dressed when I leave.

On the other two days, I generally have more flexibility. The sitter arrives at 1:00. That gives us an additional hour to get ready and eat lunch. In addition, I rarely have any appointments as early as 1:30. That allows me a little extra time. It is not unusual for me to stay as long as fifteen minutes after the sitter arrives. Now that we are homebound, I have spent as much as two of the four hours at home. I could easily get along without a sitter now, but I don’t want to run the risk of losing them should I temporarily discontinue their service.

Several times recently Kate hasn’t gotten up until late in the afternoon. The first day I made a concerted effort to get her up. I didn’t push her too hard but far enough that I got a hostile reaction. I backed away. Since then, I have let her stay in bed as long as she wanted, but it bothered me.

Friday was another one of those days. I took a very non-threatening way of waking her. About thirty minutes before trying to wake her, I turned on music that I hoped might gently wake her. Then I took my laptop into the bedroom and worked on a blog post. I waited for her to open her eyes and see that I was there and then casually spoke to her in a way that she wouldn’t take as the first step to get her out of bed. I was very relaxed. We talked a little, but I didn’t try to get her up. She seemed in a good humor but sleepy. When I finally asked if she would like to have lunch with me, she wanted me to go ahead. I told her I would really like to eat with her but said nothing more. She didn’t move. I told her I would be in the kitchen if she needed me.

This time I believe I really accepted this as part of the natural progression of her Alzheimer’s and not a time for her to change. I’m the one who needs to do that. Having done it, I feel much better. To my surprise, I think the overall adjustments we are making in connection with being homebound have made this change easier than it might have been. It’s been a time when I have fewer obligations even those that are self-imposed. Except when I prepare a meal, our lives are more relaxed.

Since Rotary is not meeting, I have changed the time for our Monday sitter to 1:00 from noon. That and the fact that I don’t have to rush away when she arrives creates a greater feeling of relaxation. Like everyone, I am accepting a lot of things that were not my first choice. Given everything that is happening, fretting over her sleeping seems less important than it was before.

From the Mountain Top to the Valley in Less Than Twenty-Four Hours

Wouldn’t you know it, right after our wonderful day Thursday, Kate had a bad day yesterday. I have no explanation except to say she has Alzheimer’s. Changes can occur from one day to another and sometimes from moment to moment. I know the source of the problem is in her brain, but I don’t know what happens that causes the brain to change like that. Here is what happened.

I started to wake Kate around 11:00. Recently, I have felt I may have been more abrupt in waking her, so I took a slower approach. I began by turning on an album of show tunes by Julie Andrews. Then I went in to say good morning without appearing to look like I was in any hurry for her to get up. She smiled. I was encouraged. When I suggested it was time to get up. She said, “In a few more minutes.” That was a clue to what followed. What she said and how she said it was exactly what she has said on other days when she didn’t want to get up.

At 11:30, I remembered that I had scheduled an appointment for haircuts at noon. They are closing all barbershops and hair salons tomorrow, and this was our last shot for a haircut. I explained that to her. Once again, she acted like she understood me and didn’t appear to be obstinate. She just closed her eyes and acted as though she didn’t hear me. I tried to encourage her to get up for fifteen minutes and then gave up. I knew she had dug in her heels.

The sitter was to arrive in another hour, so I decided I would wait for her and then get a takeout meal for myself. When Mary arrived, I explained the situation and took her to the bedroom to let Kate know that she was here. Kate hadn’t had her morning medications, so I got them for her. In the past two weeks, it has become more difficult for her to take her medicine. She puts the pill in her mouth and takes drink of water. She doesn’t, however, swallow the pill. She takes it out of her mouth.

Over the weekend, I placed a grocery order for delivery on Monday. It included apple sauce I had bought just for her medications. Then I discovered that using apple sauce doesn’t necessarily work like a charm. I put apple sauce in a spoon with a capsule on top. She took it in her mouth but didn’t swallow it. That led me to open the capsule and mix the contents in with the apple sauce. That worked. I tried another pill and had the same results I had experienced with the capsule. She swallowed the apple sauce without the pill. We tried again, and it worked. Next time (this morning) I need to crush the pills.

I got my take-out lunch and brought it back to the house. When I finished eating, I decided to take care of a couple of income tax matters. I got caught up in that and spent more time than I expected. I ended up staying at the house all but thirty minutes of the time the sitter was here. That turned out to be productive although I felt funny staying home with the sitter. The only time I left was to drop by the pharmacy for a couple of things.

Kate never stirred while Mary was here. She left at 4:30, and I went to the bedroom to see if Kate was awake. She was. We chatted briefly. She seemed all right, but, unlike yesterday, she wasn’t at all cheerful. When I mentioned that it was approaching the time for us to get a pizza, she seemed interested. When I told her I would help her get up and dressed, she responded as she had in the morning. I tried several times over fifteen minutes. Then I decided to have the Brunswick stew I had bought the day before. I set the table and heated it. I wondered if she would get up when dinner was ready and thought about what I would do if she wouldn’t. Putting up a card table and chairs beside the bed seemed like a good alternative. That turned out to be what I did.

As soon as we finished eating, she wanted to go back to bed. I turned on YouTube videos for two and a half hours. She seemed to enjoy them, but she didn’t express the kind of enthusiasm she often does. Then I wondered if she would be able to go to sleep. That did not seem to be a problem, and she slept through the night. It is now 11:00, and she is still asleep. I am on the computer in the bedroom. She has awakened several times and spoken to me. She seemed all right. The test will be what happens when I try to get her up. I’m going to wait until she wakes up again before I try that.

Sleeping In Again

For the first time in a couple of weeks, Kate didn’t want to get up on Monday. It was a day for sitter, and I was eager to eat before she came. I planned to order a takeout meal online from Panera. When realized I wasn’t likely to be successful getting her up, I decided on delivery. l thought she might be willing to get up when the food arrived.

She had other thoughts. As in the past, she didn’t seem disturbed or unhappy. She seemed quite relaxed until I started to encourage her to get up. Then I backed off and asked if she could tell me if something was wrong. At first, she couldn’t. Then she said she had a pain but couldn’t tell me where it was. I told her I would get her a Tylenol. When I brought it to her, she refused and got mad at me. I decided to let it go and left her with the sitter.

With all the emphasis on social distancing, I had been a little concerned about having a sitter, but I needed a few things from the grocery store and ran a couple of other errands. Then I went home. I had been gone only an hour and a half, but I let the sitter go. The deal with the agency is that they charge a minimum of four hours even if I return early. For that reason, I didn’t have to worry about the sitter’s losing income.

Kate was still in bed when I walked in. I put up the groceries before trying to get her up again. Getting a fresh start was a good thing. I approached the bed cheerfully and acted the way I would when I first see her each morning. I told her I was glad to see her and asked if she would like to get up. She was like a different person. She got up and dressed without a problem and wasn’t experiencing any pain.

She was like a child as we walked into the family room. She was especially taking with the flowers. The African Violets are blooming, and we still have four poinsettias. Kate loves showing everything to me as though I have never seen them before. I always express the same enthusiasm.

She was the same way eating the ham and Swiss sandwich with a side of grapes. This was the first time in a while that I had ordered anything with ham in it. She had gone through a period of time when she wasn’t eating ham. Her taste in food and beverages shifts a lot. I am now buying Diet Dr. Pepper, something she would never have drunk before. On occasion, I have gotten her Diet Pepsi at Panera. She has never liked Pepsi, but she drinks it now without noticing what it is. In fact, she never knows what drink she is drinking. Sometimes I get her lemonade, sometimes a mixture of lemonade and unsweetened tea. Only occasionally does she ask what she is drinking.

As an aside,  she has a recurring hallucination while sitting at the kitchen table. She looks at the pillows on the window seat across from her and believes she sees a person. Sometimes it is a woman, other times a man. Sometimes she/he disappears. Her vision is poor, so there are many things she sees that are confused with other things.

Since she got up at 3:15, I thought she might not want to go to bed until later. She fooled me and was in bed at 7:30 and went to sleep watching YouTube videos. As it usually does, the day ended on a high note. It was like the had had an ordinary day, and she had only been up four hours. I should add that she slept until 11:00 yesterday, had lunch, and rested again.

No “Sleeping-In” Yesterday

Following two consecutive days of not wanting to get up, Kate awoke early yesterday and wanted “to get out’a here.” Except for believing she was in an unfamiliar place, she was in a good mood. For me, one of the good things about her wanting to get away is that it makes it easier and faster to get her up and dressed. We were at Panera before 10:30. She worked on her iPad but focused mainly on her blueberry muffin and wanted another. I told her we would be going to lunch in thirty minutes and asked if she could wait. She was agreeable.

The afternoon was our usual one. She rested a couple of hours. Then I suggested we look at a photo album of pictures taken when our children were pre-school age. We did that for a while before our daughter called. We had a nice conversation and Kate handled it well. After the call, we returned to the photo album, but Kate wanted to rest a little longer.

When I suggested our going to dinner, she didn’t hesitate getting up. That is normal. I don’t recall her ever having trouble getting up after resting in the family room in the afternoon. I wish I could say that about the morning when she is in bed.

She was confused about where she was as well as who I was but wasn’t disturbed. She asked my name and asked if we would be coming back for the night. She also said a few other things that made it clear she thought we were in someone else’s house.

At dinner something came up that made me mention our marriage. Kate was shocked. I was surprised at her reaction because we had been talking so comfortably about our relationship. It wasn’t simply that she was shocked. She couldn’t imagine how it was possible that she could have forgotten something like that. Fortunately, I was able to divert her attention. She was fine after that, but I felt bad. I intend to be more careful about that in the future. I think I have been unconsciously trying to keep that memory alive. Now I am beginning to believe that it may be time to let it go. I’ll just assume that she doesn’t remember and not try to remind her. There are enough incidental reminders when we browse through her photo books and interact with other people.

We had one of those middle-of-the-night incidents at 1:30 this morning. I woke up as Kate sat up on the side of the bed. I got up and went around to her side to help her up. She seemed wide awake and cheerfully greeted me like someone she might have recognized but not known. It wasn’t long before she said, “Who are you?” I told her my name but said nothing of our relationship. She didn’t ask.

I asked if she wanted to go to the bathroom. She didn’t. She asked about “the others.” I told her we were the only ones “here.” She seemed surprised but didn’t question me. I asked again if she would like to use the bathroom. She asked where it was. I told her I would show her. We usually hold hands, but she didn’t want to this time.

When we reached the bathroom, I stepped in and turned around to direct her to the toilet. She showed no interest in coming in. Instead, she was obsessed with what time she should “be there.” I never found out where “there” was, but it was important to her. I told her she didn’t need to be there until “1:00 tomorrow.” She was surprised and asked about today. I told her it was the middle of the night and that she would need her sleep to be ready for tomorrow. She went back to the question “What time do I have to be there?” We went through a repetition my standard answer and her standard question. A couple of times she asked what time she would have to leave, but her emphasis was on what time she had to be there. She couldn’t remember and kept asking.

Finally, she used the toilet. When she was finished, she noticed two pictures on the top of a nearby cabinet. One was a photo of my mom and me. She pointed to my mom and wanted to know who she was. When I told her who she was, she said, “I remember her. She is very nice.” Then she asked about my sister. I don’t have a sister but said she was fine. Then she said my sister was very nice and that she liked her. Before getting back to bed, she commented several other times about my mom and sister and how nice they were.

Once in bed, she was still wide awake for a short time. I tried not to encourage much talking, and she soon drifted off to sleep. She is still sleeping as I finish this entry. On the video cam I just saw her moving a few minutes ago, I will check on her and see if she is ready to get up. That would be nice. I don’t have Rotary today, and the sitter is coming at 1:00 rather than noon. If she gets up soon, we would be able to have lunch together. That would be a good way to start the week.

More on Kate’s Sleep/Rest

On Friday, the day I met with Kate’s doctor, I was once again unable to get her up before the sitter arrived. She was in a good mood. She even said she would like to go to lunch with me, but she would never get up. She said something like, “Just give me a few minutes,” but she still wouldn’t get up. She stayed in bed until I got home at 5:00. Except for a short bathroom break that morning, she had been in bed nineteen hours. She was up less than two hours for us to go out to dinner and return home. She was back in bed at 7:30 and went to sleep rather quickly which is unusual.

She continued to sleep Saturday morning until 11:00 when I tried to get her up. She was resistant, but I coaxed her. I told her I was concerned about her staying in bed so much and that she needed to keep her muscles exercised or she could find herself in a wheelchair. That did the trick. Once she was up, she seemed fine. She was in a good mood, and we had a nice lunch.

When we returned home, she rested over two hours. Then I suggested that we look at one of her photo books. We spent about thirty minutes on that before going to dinner. As she had done the previous night, she got ready for bed right after dinner. I was glad to see that she woke up on her own around 9:00 this morning. She wasn’t sure where she was but wanted to “get out of here.” I told her I would take her. We passed a little over an hour at Panera before leaving for lunch. She has been resting almost two hours since returning home.

She is definitely spending more time resting with breaks for lunch and dinner most days. So far, we have had only two days when I wasn’t able to take her to lunch. There has also been an impact on her use of the iPad. I’ve been keeping a record of her daily average time on the iPad using her screen time for the correct information. For the week ending January 5, she averaged 49 minutes a day. That dropped to 39 the next week. The figures for the succeeding weeks are 25, 26 18, and only 8 minutes a day this past week. That’s a dramatic shift from my estimate of 6-8 hours a day as late as last summer.

We are in a transition phase now, and I will take it a day at a time as I attempt to establish a new routine if that is possible.