One of Those Days

Kate and I have many good days, but not always. Sunday was one of those exceptions. It began around 9:00 when I got a call from the agency that provides two of our three caregivers. The one who was to come was sick, and they were looking for a replacement. They had identified someone who might be able to take her place, but she would be on overtime, and they wanted to know if that would be all right. I gave my approval.

A little later, I received another call telling me that person couldn’t come. After we hung up, I called them back to say that if they couldn’t get someone for the whole day, I would be happy to have someone for a short time to help me get her up for the day and return later in the day to help me get her to bed.

They found someone who could come under those conditions and that she would not be on overtime. They let me know that she was inexperienced and would need my help if I were agreeable. Since I’ve been an active participant in Kate’s care, I agreed.

When she arrived, I learned that she had been in training as a medical technician. She had taken a temporary position with the in-home care agency to make a little money before continuing her previous educational plans. It didn’t take me long to find out that she was not skilled in the kind of care Kate requires. She wasn’t good at changing or dressing someone in bed, and she had never used a lift for a patient.

This was not an ideal situation, but I began optimistically with the thought that I might have learned enough to make things go smoothly. I think of myself as a pretty good assistant to our regular caregivers, I quickly learned how unskilled I am in direct patient care and training of other caregivers. Trained and experienced caregivers clearly handle situations like this without any great difficulty. I won’t go through any of the details, but it took us at least twice as long to get Kate up and in her wheelchair. Fortunately, using the lift went more smoothly.

In addition, Kate was more confused and not as cheerful as she is other times. I’m not sure that I have mentioned that for the past 4-6 weeks she has had more experiences when she doesn’t recognize me. That normally disappears after I give her my name and tell her some of our history (where we met, falling in love, having children, that we have been happily married more than 58 years, and that I love her dearly ). After that, she usually responds to me as though she knows me. It usually lasts for the rest of the day or at least a few hours. On Sunday, she asked, “Who are you?” off and on until we retired for the night.

I’ve frequently mentioned that I like routine. This was a day that was far from that and, therefore, somewhat uncomfortable for me. That was particularly true in connection with the difficulties with a substitute caregiver. I had become comfortable and dependent on our regulars. A new and unskilled caregiver was an abrupt change.

Despite that, there are good things to report. For the first time, I took Kate for ice cream without a caregiver. We went down the main hallway that is officially named “Main Street.” Our building is at one end, and the café with ice cream is almost at the other end. It was a nice stroll and a treat to enjoy time to ourselves.

After the caregiver left that night, Kate and I had another good evening. At first, she couldn’t remember who I am. I gave her my routine explanation a couple of times and ended by telling her how much I love her. That seemed to stick. We watched YouTube videos with music by The Kingston Trio and The Brothers Four. The day ended well as it always has.

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