Azheimer’s Has Been Testing Me For The Past Two Days: Part 2

The next morning (Friday), I woke up just before 4:00 and was awake for 30-45 minutes. I made up for it by sleeping until 6:25. As I started to get up, Kate spoke to me. She was wide awake and ready to get up. I asked if I could go ahead and get to the bathroom and dressed before she got up. That was fine with her. I thought she might have gone back to sleep by the time I finished, but she still wanted to get up.

Everything went smoothly, and we were in the kitchen about 7:15. That is really early for her. I fixed breakfast for both of us. She was cheerful and loved her apple juice, blueberries, and cheese toast. It was one of those times she mentioned repeatedly how good everything was. I shared some of my scrambled eggs. She also liked them. She was talkative and didn’t know who I was, but we had a good time.

When we were through, I told her I wanted to show her something. We went to the family room where I picked up a photo book of her father’s family. We’ve looked at it a lot over the years but don’t usually get through the entire book before she wants to rest. That morning was a notable exception. She took far more interest in it than she has before, and we finished the whole album.

By this time, she was tired and wanted to rest. That’s when I got my laptop and sat in a chair across from her. We had enjoyed such a good time together that I was eager to write this post. She didn’t rest long and didn’t sleep at all before gathering three different photo books in her arms and got up from the sofa as though she were going someplace. Then her attention focused on the flowers and plants outside and inside.

Moments later we took a seat and began one of those long conversations in which she is the primary speaker. I can’t begin to summarize what she said. Much of it I didn’t understand. She talked about a child or children she was serving as a mentor. At least, that would be my interpretation. She was enthusiastic about the children and the work she was doing. I was happy to be a facilitator. As I suggested in my previous post, I was eager to write about having such a special experience, but I also hated to stop her. The conversation lasted almost forty-five minutes before I brought up the subject of lunch.

We got a takeout meal, and the good times continued until we finished our meal. I stepped away from the table to pay someone for work he had just completed on our swimming pool. When I got back to the table, the look on Kate’s face had changed dramatically. I mentioned it and asked what was troubling her. She was quiet and didn’t know what to say. Over the next ten minutes or so, she didn’t talk much. She was troubled by something, but her expression didn’t suggest the usual issues. She didn’t look like she was experiencing anxiety as she does in some moments when she doesn’t know “anything.” Neither did she look afraid. She tried several times to say something. Each time she had trouble getting it out.

We were silent a few minutes before she asked if she could tell me something. I was eager to hear and quickly agreed. She began by talking about a boy and a girl. I had a hard time making any sense of it but listened without saying anything. Several times, she said she didn’t want to hurt me. I just let her talk. As she continued, it became clear that a baby was involved in some way. I began to sense that the girl and boy had had a baby out of wedlock. From her first mention that what bothered her most was hurting me, I thought she might have had a delusion about having had an affair; however, that seemed too far-fetched. Gradually, I began to realize that the girl she was talking about was her and asked.

That began an additional conversation in which I tried to reassure her that I would forgive her and that we could continue our relationship as though it had never happened. The sitter arrived at that point. I told her we would join her shortly. We talked an additional 25 minutes before I walked Kate to the family room. We spoke with Mary a few minutes. Then I told Kate I had a few things I wanted to take care of in the kitchen (my office) and assured her I would be at home and Mary would be in the room with her.

Everything was all right for two hours before Kate walked into the kitchen looking for me. She was disturbed again. This time she wanted to talk with her mother. Like the issues I confronted the day before, I felt on the spot to say the “right” thing without knowing for sure what that was. This time I told her that her mother had died. I almost always avoid telling her because it sometimes bothers her though only momentarily. Normally, she accepts it without a problem.

It was different this time. She wasn’t hurt at all, but she adamantly refused to accept what I had said and continued to ask to call her. I reminded her that she had cared for her mother the last 5 ½ years of her life here in our house. She never believed what I said and asked to speak to her father. I reminded her that he had died 30 years ago. That didn’t fly any better than telling her about her mother.

At least, Kate decided to go in a different direction. She said she could call her parents’ church, and they would know. I told her we might have trouble reaching someone who might know about her parents. Strangely, she accepted that although she repeated her desire to call the church several other times over the next 30-45 minutes.

I brought up her brother and said we could call him. That pleased her, but I placed calls to Michigan where he and his wife are spending the summer and was unable to reach him. Then she talked about friends who might be able to help. I thought of a woman with whom she had worked when she was the church librarian. I was unable to reach her as well.

A couple of years ago, I started a 3-ring binder with information about Kate and her family. I remembered that it contained a copy of her father’s obituary. The binder was sitting on the table in front of us. I opened it and read the obituary. Kate finally accepted that her father had died. Then I went to my computer and pulled up her mother’s obituary and read it. She accepted that as well, but that led to an additional problem.

She was quiet for a moment before saying, “I have to go to Fort Worth.” That is where she was born and lived until two years after we married. She asked if I would take her. At first, I tried to discourage her, but that was a mistake. I switched gears and agreed to take her.

We got up from the sofa and went to the car for one of our regular drives “home.” I drove for 30 minutes before stopping to order a takeout pizza from a place near our house. During the drive, she calmed down and forgot all about going home or wanting to call her parents. We picked up the pizza brought it home, and the rest of the evening went well. The day’s crises were things of the past.

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