Examples of Kate’s Decline

Each morning I find myself wondering “What’s in store for today?” Even though most days go well, I am always on alert for problems. That’s how I was two days ago. I knew the sitter was to arrive at 1:00 and that I had an appointment to donate platelets shortly after that. I wanted to get her up in time for us to have lunch together. Around 9:00, I was encouraged when I heard her talking . I went back to the bedroom. She greeted me with a smile and chatted a few minutes. She said she was waiting for someone to take her home. I told her I would be happy to do that. She said that her mother would do it. Then she said it was “that guy” whose name she couldn’t recall. I asked her if she was ready to get up. She wasn’t. I told her I would be in the kitchen and to call me when she was ready. I was going to give her another hour or so before going in again, but less than thirty minutes passed before I heard her say, “I’m here.” She was ready to go home.

I took her to Panera for a muffin and then to lunch. As my previous posts about her sleeping later suggests, she gets very tired. She had taken her place on the sofa in the family room before Mary arrived. She was still there when I returned. During the past two or three weeks, with a couple of exceptions, she appears to have rested the entire time the sitters were here. Although she is comfortable with both sitters, I have the impression that she is going through a stage when she feels especially dependent on me and simply waits for me to come home. I am sure that is true with respect to using the bathroom. I’m only aware of one time she has gone to the bathroom while the sitter is here. That was recently when the sitter helped her get up and dressed after she had slept late.

I see this dependency in other small ways. She likes me to sit beside her when we sit in a booth at restaurant. The same is true at Casa Bella when we are seated at a table for six or eight. She wants to hold my hand more often when we are walking. She wants more instructions about what to do when toileting, brushing teeth, taking a shower, getting ready for bed. She hasn’t given up all signs of independence, but she is coming close to that.

She is forgetting a lot with respect to eating. She often points to the bread on the table at a restaurant and asks what it is. When I tell her, it doesn’t necessarily help. She is still a good eater, but she often fails to recognize the entree on her plate. She doesn’t recognize the salt and pepper at our neighborhood Mexican restaurant. Part of the confusion is that they are in the small Corona beer bottles, but the salt and pepper are clearly visible though not to her.

She also worries more frequently. Sometimes it involves a belief that she has an obligation of some sort. She worries about whether she has forgotten to do something. She also worries about people who have financial and health problems. The other night she talked a good while about some kind of disease that is being transmitted from mothers to their babies. She said there was a preventive medication that mothers can take. She told me she was planning to have herself tested. On the way to dinner last night, she was worried she might have done something to me that she shouldn’t. I assured her she hadn’t.

I also notice she isn’t as cheerful throughout the day. I think that goes along with her being tired. She does, however, have moments off and on during the day when she is very lighthearted and takes great pleasure in teasing me.

Taken together these things and many others are signs of the progression of her Alzheimer’s. We still have “Happy Moments,” but it is clear that I am unable to control everything. Some people suggest the disease always wins. In a sense this is true; however, I consider it a victory that we have been able to live happily, even joyfully, for so long. I intend for us to do as much as we can as long as we can, but I also recognize the reality that Kate’s decline means significant changes in our lifestyle.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *