A Shift from Confusion to Enjoyment

It is 2:00 Sunday afternoon as I begin this post. Kate and I returned from lunch an hour ago. As is her custom, she took her place on the sofa in our family room and has been resting ever since while I busied myself with several tasks on my laptop in a chair across from her.

She was asleep for almost an hour before waking and looking through a photo book our son Kevin had made of a trip we made to New York City in 2015. We had taken him and his youngest son along with our daughter Jesse and her twin sons. It was the last big trip we took. Kate doesn’t often browse through the book, and I was surprised to see her so engaged with it. She talked to herself all the way through it. I wasn’t clear whether she was awake or asleep, but she enjoyed herself. I didn’t pick up everything she said. It didn’t appear that she recognized it as a book with photos of people she knows (knew?). Her comments were just about what she saw. When she finished, she closed her eyes a few minutes then opened them and said, “I like this place. I really really like it. Ahhh.” I caught her eye and said, “You look happy.” She said, “I am. Are you?” I said, “I’m very happy,” and I was.

The day didn’t begin this way. When I first heard her this morning, it was 9:45. She looked like she was contemplating whether or not she should get up. I said, “Good morning. It’s good to see you.” She didn’t give me the smile I was hoping for. Instead, it was a look that suggested she had no idea who I was and wasn’t sure she wanted to know.

It didn’t take long to discover that she seemed wide awake but unsure of what she should do. I told her it looked like she was about to get up and said I would be glad to help her. She wasn’t sure. I told her I could get her clothes for the day and make breakfast for her. She hesitated. Then she asked me if I would take her home. I told her I would. That was all she needed.

I got her up and to the bathroom without any difficulty. She was perfectly comfortable with me throughout the bathroom routine and getting dressed although she never gave any sign of affection or strong feeling about me.

The first sign of happiness came when we walked into the family room. She first stopped to look at the African violets. Then she saw the poinsettias that are still healthy, if not completely red, after six months. Next she took interest in her ceramic cat and then a photo of our son when he was about 8 or 10. She was beginning to cheer up.

By the time we got to the kitchen for breakfast it was almost 10:30. I decided to take advantage of her being up early and get an early lunch at Andriana’s; therefore, I only gave her juice and a small bowl of blueberries and raspberries. We have three anniversary cards on our kitchen table. At almost every meal she likes to look at them and have me read them to her. It is interesting that even when she doesn’t realize that I am her husband, reading the cards does not strike her as a surprise. That was the way it went this morning.

While she was eating, she seemed to become increasingly at ease. She hasn’t mentioned my taking her home again. That continued on the drive to the restaurant. We enjoyed our time together at lunch. At one point, our server introduced us to her 11-year-old daughter who happened to be there. As they walked away from the table, Kate said, “Mr. and Mrs.? Does that mean . . .” She didn’t finish the question. I said, “Yes, we are husband and wife.” She was quite surprised. I was even more surprised that she remembered the server’s referring to us as “Mr. and Mrs.”  I told her we had just celebrated our 57th anniversary a week ago. Then I said, “I hope that doesn’t bother you.” She said it didn’t, and it looked as though she were telling the truth. This led to a wonderful conversation about the good times we have had.

This kind of transition often occurs in the morning. It begins with her having a blank slate with respect to her recollections of anything. That leads to a feeling of concern that is sometimes very mild. Other times it is more intense. In every case, she ultimately comes out of it as she is exposed to more experience with her surroundings. She begins to feel at home.

As I close this post, she is once again looking at the NYC photo book. She just said to herself, “Isn’t this wonderful? <pause> Let’s see who all is in here. <pause> Okie Dokie. <pause> You’ll love it. <pause> Let’s see. Just a minute. Let me see. Hey.” She is obviously happy, and I am happy to see her enjoy it by herself. That is a rare event.

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